Subscribe for all my updates and don't miss a thing! Sign me up!

What Fruit Is Jamaica Known For?
8 Top Fruits & Native Varieties

Sharing Is Caring! Share this awesome content with your friends now.

start_here_if_new_image_link

Watch! See the real Jamaica in VIDEOS!
Click Here and see why over 60,000 fans are raving about my YouTube Channel!


jamaican_ackee_podWhat Fruit Is Jamaica Known For? | Jamaican Ackee

by Venesha Johnson | Associate Writer

Jamaica has a variety of fruits but a few have become quite “associated” with the island.


New! For Authentic Jamaican products, from my very own handsvisit my Etsy store here.


Ackee

ackee_and_saltfish.jpgAckee and Saltfish

We all know that ackee and saltfish is the island’s national dish, but did you know that ackee is actually a fruit, not a vegetable? As a matter of fact, it doubles as Jamaica’s national fruit. However, while it is a significant part of our culture, the ackee is not indigenous to Jamaica.

According to legend, in 1778, Commander Bligh, the captain of a slave ship, transported the Ackee from West Africa to Jamaica. But in 1793, Captain William Bligh, a well-known English seaman, brought the fruit from Jamaica to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, England, where it was first made known to scientists.

The fruit was given the scientific name Blighia sapida in recognition of the Captain's "discovery" Ackee and saltfish were frequently served with breadfruit, which was introduced to Jamaica by the same Captain Bligh.

The term "Ankye," which comes from the Twi language of Ghana, is whence the word "Ackee" originated. Ackee is known by the scientific name Blighia sapida. Ackee can be poisonous if forced opened or not cleaned and boiled properly before consumption. 

But when it is, it is a delicious addition to any menu. Here are some of our favourite ways to have ackee:

Mango

Watch Video! MANGO TIME! Let's Go To 'Mango Walk' with CJ and Ms. Pat

This fruit has a strong head start in the running of the most popular and loved fruit in Jamaica. Some would argue that it should be considered the national fruit. In general, the mango season in Jamaica begins in April or May and lasts until July or August.

Although the mango is thought to have originated in India, it is a very popular fruit in this country. Mango is still used today to make a variety of dishes, including desserts, cocktails, ice cream, juices, and chutneys.

Mango season is an exciting time for Jamaicans, and for most, 1 or 2 is never enough to be had in 1 sitting, but maybe 6 will do. Some of the most popular mangos are east Indian, stringy, number, greengage, rusty, Julie and Bombay. It’s tradition to have green mangoes with salt and a healthy dash of pepper.

Otaheite Apples

jamaican_apple_treeJamaican Otaheite Apples

The Jamaican Otaheite apple, is arguably the second most popular fruit in Jamaica. Syzygium Malaccense, the scientific name for this apple, is a kind of flowering tree that is thought to have originated in Malaysia (hence the name Malay rose apple), but it is also connected to Australia, Vietnam, Thailand, New Guinea, and Indonesia.

Although it may be found on other Caribbean Islands, it was first brought to Jamaica in 1793, where it has since thrived and integrated itself into our culture to the point that it is one of the fruits that are used to "define" us.

The Otaheite apple may vary in texture, some may be soft and juicy while others may be on the crunchier side. While it is most commonly eaten as is, it also makes quite a delicious drink.

Pineapples

pine_farming_in_jamaicaJamaican Pine

A traditional tropical fruit with luscious, sweet yellow flesh covered by a thick orange peel and a crown of lush green spikes. One of the island's most adaptable fruits, the pineapple is used in our holiday ham recipes and juices, jams, and jellies.

The pineapple is believed to have been brought to Jamaica by the Tainos from south America. Its name is often shortened and simply referred to as “pine”.

Banana

history_of_banana_in_jamaicaJamaican Banana Tree

Bananas are probably the most abundant fruit in Jamaica. It’s that one fruit that you can get all year round. They are boiled when green and had as a side dish to many of your favourite Jamaican dishes such as brown stew, curry, ackee and saltfish, and many others. Ripe bananas are eaten as is or used to make pastries, fritters or smoothies.

Native Fruits

jamaican_ugli_ketoaskJamaican Ugli
  • Ugli- a grapefruit, tangerine, and orange hybrid. It is called Ugli (ugly), because of its disfigured features.
jamaican_grapefruit_onemanswonderJamaican Grapefruit | (Photo: onemanswonder.com)
  • Grapefruit- It is believed that grapefruit originated in Jamaica because the country is where the phrase "grapefruit" was first recorded in writing, in 1814. Its name refers to the fact that it forms clusters like grapes as it matures.

    The grapefruit is a cross between a sweet orange and a citrus shrub known as a shaddock, named for the captain who brought it to the West Indies from Polynesia in the 18th century.
tangerine_observerJamaican Tangerine | (Photo: Jamaica Observer)
  • Ortanique- As its name suggests, the ortanique is a mix between an orange and a tangerine. It is a distinctively Jamaican fruit that was initially propagated in Manchester.

Fruits Native To The West Indies

Their some fruits that are not native to Jamaica but are native to the west indies.

Cassava, cashew, cocoa, guava, and cassia are indigenous to the West Indies. Cassava, also known as yucca, or "staff of life," was a staple food among Tainos and is an Arawak word.

The cashew tree grows best in regions with little rainfall, and in the past, cashew nuts in their shells were utilized in several kid-friendly activities in Jamaica.

The discovery of cocoa in Jamaica long before Columbus' arrival led to a rise in its value in 1847 when chocolate production got underway.

The fruit Guinep, is popular throughout the Caribbean as well, but you may see it being reffered to by different names, including Spanish lime, mamoncillo, honeyberry, chennette, quenette. Not to be confused with Jamaican Ackee mentioned above, Barbadians call this fruit ackee.

Out favourite way to utilise these fruits especially during seasons of abundance, is to make many refreshing drinks. You can try some of our recipes too.

You might like these

Sharing IS Caring! Please help me get the message out by sharing this article with your friends on social media (links below). Thnx ;-)


If you found this page useful, please consider subscribing to my weekly newsletter, to get even more

It tells you each week about the new information that I have added, including new developments and great stories from lovers of Jamaica! 

Return to Jamaican Fruit from What Fruit Is Jamaica Known For?
Return to My Island Jamaica Homepage from What Fruit IS Jamaica Known For?

References & Sources For What Fruit Is Jamaica Known For?

  1. 5 best cultural and historical attractions in Kingston (2022) Things to do in Jamaica. Available at: https://things-to-do-in-jamaica.com/5-best-cultural-and-historical-attractions-in-kingston/ (Accessed: November 23, 2022).
  2. Jamaican apple - 9 surprising health benefits (plus the drink recipe) (no date) My Island Jamaica. Available at: https://www.my-island-jamaica.com/jamaican_apple.html (Accessed: November 23, 2022).
  3. Jamaican mangoes (no date) My Island Jamaica. Available at: https://www.my-island-jamaica.com/jamaican-mangoes.html (Accessed: November 23, 2022).

What Fruit Is Jamaica Known For? | Written: November 23, 2022

Back To The Top Of This Page

New! Talk To Me
Was the information helpful? Something needs changing? I welcome
your feedback here.

Read More ...

New! Comments

Have your say about what you just read! Leave me a comment in the box below.

Recommended For You ...


Other Great Articles You Might Have Missed

P.S. Didn't find what you were looking for? 
Still need help?

Click Here to try our dependable and effective Site Search tool. It works!

Or, simply click here and here, to browse my library of over 500 questions and answers! Chances are someone already asked (and got an answer to) your question.


copyscape
Back To The Top Of This Page

Like My Site? Please Click Here To Share It With Your Friends

Home   |   JOIN US   |   Site Search   |   Have Your Say   |   Archives   |   Old Archives   |   Contact   |   Disclaimer   |   TIP ME!   |   Link To Us


Do like I did! Share your passion
(about your city, hobby or experience) and make a living from it. Click Here to see how
.

By Wellesley Gayle   |   Copyright © 2007-2022 My-Island-Jamaica.com   |   All rights Reserved.   |   Privacy Policy